HHC Classics

YZ – Taggin’ It Up

YZ tape cover

So, I already published the interview with Tony D that was part of a big Trenton retrospective that I wrote for Hip-Hop Connection. I’d forgotten until I saw the cuttings the other day, but it was a spliced up piece containing quotes from Tony, Wise Intelligent and YZ, rather than separate interviews. Which makes me feel even better about disinterring this stuff and presenting it wholesale.

For me, YZ didn’t quite hit the heights on the albums that his talent deserved. Sons of the Father and The Ghetto’s Been Good to me were more than solid sets, but just slightly held back by a touch of filler, not uncommon for albums back then. However, the YZ EP, for me, deserves to be discussed in the same terms as Intoxicated Demons or All Souled Out.

Of the three Trenton interviewees, I think YZ was the trickiest to pin down, set a date with and then actually get on the phone. But it was worth the effort, even if we ran out of time with about 15 questions left. Still, that’s a sign that he wasn’t monosyllabic. Of course, I was the ideal person to interview YZ because, with the weight I’d put on at this time, clearly the gateaux had been good to me.

Stay tuned for that Wise Intelligent piece coming soon to round off the Trenton Trilogy of Terror.

Continue reading →

Posted by drewhuge in HHC Classics, Interviews, 0 comments

Trenton Where We Live: Tony D interview

Hip-hop heroes seem to be dropping like flies recently. I prefer them when they’re droppin’ funky verses. I spoke to Trenton, New Jersey producer and rapper Tony D not very long before he died, in an interview for Hip-Hop Connection. I spoke to YZ and Wise Intelligent in the same week and it was nice to join the dots between the three, even after a lot of not always smooth history.

Tony D reading a newspaper

Continue reading →

Posted by drewhuge in HHC Classics, Interviews

That’s what Connections is all about

hip-hop connection connection page

Many thanks to Leaders of the New School for the dodgy grammar of that post title.

Hip-Hop Connection, the world’s first rap monthly (take that, The Source) started out as a phoneline before taking shape as a magazine. Courtesy of first Chris Hunt at the Tower of Power, then Andy Cowan at the Tomb of Boom, HHC went through many iterations, shoved from publisher to publisher. We’ll dig into HHC history in due course, but a feature of its early days, inherited from the phoneline concept, was ‘Connections’ where you could make contact with like-minded readers. Continue reading →

Posted by drewhuge in HHC Classics